GET INVOLVED!

Seeing the Elephant in the Room

As a concerned parent and Academy Award nominee who helped alert the world to the elephant crisis in the landmark “Agony and Ivory” article in Vanity Fair in 2011, written by Alex Shoumatoff, I deplore the recent CITES decision in South Africa to not give maximum protection to elephants.
Continue reading “Seeing the Elephant in the Room” »

Read More

Ivory trader’s diary may spill the beans

The personal journal of a suspected ivory trader purportedly contained clues to the identities of a handful of rich wildlife trophy collectors who possessed artefacts carved from the tusks of elephants poached for their ivory in Kerala.

Read More

Sweeping ivory ban passed in California will prohibit sale of elephant ivory and rhinoceros horn

In an attempt to limit the slaughter of elephants and rhinos, the state of California has passed a sweeping ivory ban that will prohibit the sale of nearly all products made from ivory and rhinoceros horn.
Read The Full Article…

Several drugs are commonly used to treat numerous types of infection caused by bacteria, such as pneumonia and infections of the ear. Positively, the catalog is quite large. Nowadays many folk search online for the exact phrase Sildenafil generic on the Internet. It is also known as Sildenafil. The definition of erectile disfunction the persistent impossibility to maintain an erection to the point of orgasm, act an estimated 15 to 30 millions men in the America alone. Erectile dysfunction can often indicate problems in other area.

Read More

Free Trade Can Save the Rhino

Is it possible that Michael Froman can succeed where both Leonardo DiCaprio and David Beckham have not? Maybe — if the job is saving the rhino, whose population has dwindled to about 29,000 as poaching reaches record highs in countries such as South Africa.

Read More

Chelsea Clinton: To protect Africa’s elephants, stop the demand

Over the past several months, the confiscation of several large shipments of ivory has once again shed light on the troubling persistence of both illegal wildlife trafficking and demand for ivory—a collective tragedy that costs the lives of more than 32,000 elephants every year.

Read More

Saving African elephants starts at home

The United States has a problem with elephants. It’s not that we don’t like them, per se – it’s that we like the things made of them (ivory jewelry and carved statues, taxidermied trophies, and the like) far too much. Despite some older laws that restrict commerce in elephant parts, professional traffickers and American tourists have spent decades bringing illegal ivory across our borders, thousands of pieces every year, and, as a result, this country is partly to blame for the ongoing free-fall of African elephant numbers.

Read More

Biotech firm creates fake rhino horn to reduce poaching

A San Francisco biotech startup has managed to 3D print fake rhino horns that carry the same genetic fingerprint as the actual horn. It plans to flood Chinese market with these cheap horns to curb poaching.

Read More

Seneca Park Zoo Shows Visitors ‘Ivory Crush’ in NYC

ROCHESTER, N.Y. — Seneca Park Zoo is raising awareness to the ongoing issue of poaching elephants and illegal ivory trade.

Read More

China’s ivory market looks to be cooling amid Beijing’s restrictions

Beijing’s curbs on the sale of elephant tusks appear to be taking effect, with the previously runaway prices of ivory on the mainland levelling off, according to a Nairobi-based academic who studies the illegal wildlife trade.

Read More

‘Lifeless pile of tusks’ crushed in NYC to protest ivory trade

On Friday, illegal elephant ivory was put on display and then destroyed in the center of Times Square in New York City. Elephant poaching is soaring according to conservation groups, as a pound of ivory can fetch $1,500 on the black market. Hari Sreenivasan reports.

Read More

Why Can’t We Protect Elephants?

They need our help, not an easier way to make their carcasses into trophies.
Read More »

For Now, Trump to Keep Ban on Importing Elephant Trophies

The president reversed his own administration’s decision in an evening tweet, prohibiting trophies of killed elephants from being brought into the country.
Read More »

Trump Bags Another Anti-Obama Trophy: Dead Elephants

The administration is lifting a ban on importing elephant parts severed as trophies after the animals are shot in Zimbabwe.
Read More »

Trump Administration to Lift Ban on ‘Trophy’ Elephant Imports

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said it planned to reverse a ban on the imports from Zimbabwe, following its earlier move to allow them from Zambia.
Read More »

Lions next in line of fire as US rolls back curbs on African hunting trophies

The Trump administration’s lifting of restrictions on importing elephant body parts from Zimbabwe and Zambia is not the last gift to hunting interests

Hunting interests have scored a major victory with the Trump administration’s decision to allow Americans to bring home body parts of elephants shot for sport in Africa. Another totemic species now looks set to follow suit – lions.

As the US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) was announcing it was lifting a ban on the import of elephant “trophies” from Zimbabwe and Zambia, it also quietly published new guidelines that showed lions shot in the two African countries will also be eligible to adorn American homes.

Related: Trump sons' hunting in focus as US lifts import ban on African elephant trophies

Continue reading...
Read More »

Trump sons’ hunting in focus as US lifts import ban on African elephant trophies

  • Obama administration imposed ban because of conservation concerns
  • Donald Trump Jr and Eric Trump are enthusiastic big game hunters

The Trump administration’s decision to loosen restrictions around the import of elephant trophies from Zimbabwe and Zambia has turned attention back to the president’s family’s own connection to the controversial sport.

Donald Trump Jr and Eric Trump are prolific big-game hunters and during the 2016 campaign, images re-emerged of the pair on a 2011 hunting trip posing with animals they had killed on safari, including an elephant, a buffalo and a leopard.

The GOP. Here's Donald Trump Jr. holding the tail of an elephant (party symbol) that he killed. #TrumpSacrifices pic.twitter.com/FIGkcH2F0t

What went so wrong with Trump sons that they could kill this beautiful creature pic.twitter.com/L1gquLQrRz

Related: 'There's no sport in that': trophy hunters and the masters of the universe

Continue reading...
Read More »

US to allow imports of elephant trophies from Zimbabwe

Campaigners fear move by Trump administration will damage global efforts to end the ivory trade

Donald Trump’s administration plans to allow imports of elephant trophies from Zimbabwe into the US – a move campaigners fear could damage global momentum on ending the ivory trade.

In 2014, US big game hunters killing elephants in Zimbabwe were banned from bringing their trophies home, on the basis that the country had failed to show that it was taking elephant management seriously.

Continue reading...
Read More »

Animals Strike Curious Poses by Elena Passarello review – brilliant essays on immortal beasts

The meanings of Dürer’s rhino, Mozart’s starling, Darwin’s tortoise and others explored with wild imagination and pyrotechnic prose

Elena Passarello starts this extraordinary book with the image of Yuka, a woolly mammoth chiselled from the softening permafrost by Siberian tusk hunters in 2010. First a rounded hoof comes into view, then a hollowed-out eye and finally the flank still bearing evidence of the gash that must have done for young Yuka – she was no more than 10 years old when she died – nearly 40 millennia ago. Most surprising of all, though, is the burning smoulder of her pelt, which has kept to its unconvincing ginger-red despite the passing centuries. Whoever knew that woolly mammoths shared their hair colour with dime-store dolls?

As Yuka is flopped on to the snowmobile it is not her odd dislocations – most of her spine is gone although her legs remain rigid – that qualify as one of the “curious poses” of the book’s title (taken incidentally from a line in “When Doves Cry” by Prince). It is what happens next, Passarello suggests, that stretches and shrinks Yuka into something truly strange. First she becomes the object of hard financial bargaining as the tusk hunters hide her carcass in a frozen cave and wait for the highest bidder. Then, when the scientists finally get their hands on her, she morphs into the poster child for a “rewilding” initiative that aims to make extinct breeds live again by splicing their ancient DNA into the embryo of their nearest living relatives.

Passarello moves between musicology, biography and the golden throat of a bird brain with virtuosic ease

Continue reading...
Read More »

The week in wildlife – in pictures

Pintail ducks, an elephant seal pup and an osprey in action are among this week’s pick of images from the natural world

Continue reading...
Read More »

A green tree frog and an erupting volcano: Friday’s best photos

The Guardian’s picture editors bring you a selection of photo highlights, including a baby elephant and Melania Trump on the Great Wall

Continue reading...
Read More »

Man jailed after rhino horns and elephant tusks are found in attic

Abbas Allawi is sentenced to 14 months for trying to sell on Instagram endangered animal parts worth up to £2m

A would-be trader in endangered animal parts has been jailed after rhino horns, elephant tusks and hippo teeth worth up to £2m were discovered by specially trained search dogs in a police raid.

Abbas Allawi, 52, was arrested when officers from the Metropolitan police’s wildlife crime unit searched his home in Gisburne Way, Watford, on 19 October last year.

Continue reading...
Read More »

Man jailed after rhino horns and elephant tusks are found in attic

Abbas Allawi is sentenced to 14 months for trying to sell on Instagram endangered animal parts worth up to £2m

A would-be trader in endangered animal parts has been jailed after rhino horns, elephant tusks and hippo teeth worth up to £2m were discovered by specially trained search dogs in a police raid.

Abbas Allawi, 52, was arrested when officers from the Metropolitan police’s wildlife crime unit searched his home in Gisburne Way, Watford, on 19 October last year.

Continue reading...
Read More »

Subscribe to our mailing list