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Petition successful! Move Sunder the elephant to Karnataka: Bombay High Court

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The Bombay high court on Tuesday directed the chief forest officer, wildlife (Kolhapur), to immediately take steps to relocate Sunder, a 14-year-old elephant currently housed in Kolhapur’s Jyotiba temple, and file a compliance report before the court by December 23.
A division bench of justices VM Kanade and MS Sonak gave this direction while hearing a petition filed by Dr Manilal Valliyate on behalf of People for Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA).

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Ethiopia: Authority’s Hands On Wildlife Trafficking

[Addis Fortune]Officials at the Ethiopian Wildlife Conservation Authority (EWCA) including Dawud Mume, the director general want to see enhanced expertise among law enforcement officers in order to tackle wildlife trafficking. Curbing this illegal acti…

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Success as 52 poachers are arrested, including 9 bush meat poachers, 1 elephant…

Success as 52 poachers are arrested, including 9 bush meat poachers, 1 elephant poacher and 1 rhino horn poacher.

Operating on the front line, these crucial Anti-Poaching Teams are the last line of defense for wildlife. Read more on The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust‘s Anti-Poaching efforts throughout October: http://bit.ly/1rcMm84

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Kenya: Jumbos Injure Eight Children in Kitui

[The Star]Two elephants on Sunday morning strayed into Kyangunga village, Katulani district, Kitui county and injured eight children.

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Wildlife crime study finds 33,000 items worth £7m for sale online

Biggest ever survey in 16 countries finds adverts for live tigers, orangutans and chimps – plus a ‘toilet-trained’ gorilla

The world’s endangered wildlife is for sale on the world wide web: live tigers, bears, orangutans and chimpanzees are all just a few clicks away. For those seeking a more manageable purchase, there are emerald boas, hummingbirds or poison dart frogs available by the dozen.

The trade in animal products is just as vigorous. Ivory dominates, but also on offer are polar bear rugs, snow leopards’ teeth and a £55,000 cup fashioned from a rhino’s horn.

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Should Kruger National Park sell its rhinos? Kruger National Park is home to th…

Should Kruger National Park sell its rhinos?

Kruger National Park is home to the world’s largest rhino population, but it’s also a hot spot for poachers.

Park officials plan to sell some off Kruger’s rhinos to game reserves to better protect the species: http://www.dw.de/kruger-national-park-to-sell-rhinos/a-18078918

Image copyright Getty images

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#Sharethis. Give the gift of life this holiday season

#Sharethis. Give the gift of life this holiday seasonMake a wish come trueThere are 89 vulnerable orphan elephants in our care, each dreaming of one day enjoying a life back in the wild. Make their wishes come true and foster an orphaned elephant for a…

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Namibia: More Rhinos Poached in Etosha

[New Era]Ongwediva -Two more rhino carcasses were found in Etosha National Park between last week Thursday and Sunday, bringing the number of rhinos poached in Etosha this year to three.

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Ivory dealer arrested in Gabon with 33 kilos of ivory

He risks just up to 6 months imprisonment, a ridiculous sentence, giving that those tusks are just a tiny fraction of the annual revenue of the trafficker. He was arrested in Libreville by the Intervention Brigade of the Judicial Police, assisted by the NGO Conservation Justice. Gabon is just pretending to care about its elephants. […]

The post Ivory dealer arrested in Gabon with 33 kilos of ivory appeared first on Elephant Action League.

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Confessions of an Ivory Consumer Author Howard French opens up in The Atlantic…

Confessions of an Ivory Consumer

Author Howard French opens up in The Atlantic: ‘I have a confession to make. As a young man living in West Africa in the early 1980s, I often bought souvenirs made of ivory. Usually, they were intended as gifts—a pendant, an earring, a piece of tableware.’

http://theatln.tc/1zIZXsU


Confessions of an Ivory Consumer
www.theatlantic.com
I acknowledge my role in endangering African elephants, and Western countries should too.

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Stampeding Black Elephants

by Thomas Friedman, New York Times http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/23/opinion/sunday/thomas-l-friedman-stampeding-black-elephants.html?_r=1 SYDNEY, Australia — I participated in the World Parks Congress in Sydney last week and learned a new phrase: “a black elephant.” A black elephant, explained the London-based investor and environmentalist Adam Sweidan, is a cross between “a black swan” (an unlikely, unexpected event with enormous ramifications) and […]

The post Stampeding Black Elephants appeared first on Elephant Action League.

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Chelsea Clinton Turns to the Fashion Industry for Help With the Elephant Poachin…

Chelsea Clinton Turns to the Fashion Industry for Help With the Elephant Poaching Crisis

‘In raising global awareness about the crisis and also raising awareness about how important it is to not buy ivory, we knew that the fashion community would be a natural partner if they were interested’ http://news.instyle.com/2014/11/20/chelsea-clinton-elephant-poaching-crisis/

Photo Barbra Kinney, Clinton Foundation

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On safari in Zimbabwe – with poachers turned gamekeepers

Mark Butcher, winner of Guardian Travel’s Ethical award for 2014, is helping to rebuild tourism to Zimbabwe by solving local issues in concert with conservation at his Imvelo Safari Lodges
Video: how elephants are being protected by ex-poachers in Zimbabwe

At dawn the bush comes to life. Birds sing, a lion roars and a tiny deer steps gingerly past my veranda. As the first rays of light touch the acacias, there is a soft voice by the canvas and a tea tray is set out. Soon after sunrise, I grab my camera and climb on an open-top Land Rover to set out on the hunt for animals. The safari experience is underway.

I’m in Zimbabwe but you could apply the same paragraph to any one of a dozen African countries and thousands of safari trips. It’s a gorgeous thing to feel so deep in the wilderness, with nature in the raw just a whisker away. But what we don’t see, not very often, is the underpinning behind this ravishing image. Who works there? Where does the money go? What, if anything, does the operation contribute towards the preservation of the wilderness it exploits? And how secure is the long-term future of that wilderness? I had come on a trip that offers just that: a chance to see, clearly, what lies beneath.

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