GET INVOLVED!

Petition successful! Move Sunder the elephant to Karnataka: Bombay High Court

thumb-3

The Bombay high court on Tuesday directed the chief forest officer, wildlife (Kolhapur), to immediately take steps to relocate Sunder, a 14-year-old elephant currently housed in Kolhapur’s Jyotiba temple, and file a compliance report before the court by December 23.
A division bench of justices VM Kanade and MS Sonak gave this direction while hearing a petition filed by Dr Manilal Valliyate on behalf of People for Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA).

Original article by

Botswana: China Decision Worries Wildlife Minister

[Botswana Daily News] Kasane -Minister of Environment, Wildlife and Tourism, Mr Tshekedi Khama has expressed concern over China’s decision to ban ivory trade for a period of one year.

Read More »

Malawi steps up to burn entire ivory stockpile Later this week, Malawi will bur…

Malawi steps up to burn entire ivory stockpile

Later this week, Malawi will burn its entire 4 tonne stockpile of ivory in a demonstration of the country’s commitment to wildlife conservation and the fight against wildlife crime.

As one of the world’s poorest countries, Malawi’s decision to publicly destroy its stockpiles is of humbling significance and the government must be commended for their courageous stance to make conservation a priority, despite the country facing tough times. This really should be a call to wealthier nations to sharpen up their game.

Jonny Vaughan of the Lilongwe Wildlife Trust notes that “The crucial point here is not how much the ivory is worth in illegal markets. What matters is the value of a live elephant. It’s been estimated that in purely commercial terms a living elephant is worth 75 times more than a dead one. That’s how important the tourism industry is.”

Wildlife crime campaigner Ian Redmond rightly adds that the “true value” of elephants “lies… in the work they do every day as the ‘gardeners of the forests and savannahs’.”

http://ind.pn/1xrEzM6

Read More »

Malawi: Nation to Celebrate Global Wildlife Day on 2 April

[Malawi News Agency] Lilongwe -Malawi will on 2nd April be celebrating World Wildlife Day, focusing on efforts to protect elephant populations by putting an end to the illegal ivory trade.

Read More »

Pilgrims’ litter puts forest jumbos on high-plastic diet

Researchers examining elephant dung in the Nilgiris have found plastic, tetra packs and small cups made of thermocol in the poop, leading to concerns about enforcement of rules for visitors to forest areas.

Read More »

Pilgrims’ litter puts jumbos on plastic diet

Researchers examining elephant dung in the Nilgiris have found plastic, tetra packs and small cups made of thermocol in the poop, leading to concerns about enforcement of rules for visitors to forest areas.

Read More »

Happy Weekend Everyone! Like the orphans at the The David Sheldrick Wildlife Tr…

Happy Weekend Everyone! Like the orphans at the The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust, we hope this weekend gives our fellow elephant lovers something to smile about.

Read More »

Miracle Clay for Injured Elephants Suffering from a horrendous leg wound caused…

Miracle Clay for Injured Elephants

Suffering from a horrendous leg wound caused by a poacher’s cable snare, young orphan Mwashoti is now safely in the care of the The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust.

One key component of Mwashoti’s treatment is the regular application of green clay, a completely natural substance which, when applied to an open wound, speeds up the body’s natural healing process and protects against further infection.

You can help in the healing too by gifting a supply of green clay to the DSWT, ensuring that Mwashoti and other orphans in need receive the urgent medical attention they require. Please visit the special gift shop at: http://giftshop.sheldrickwildlifetrust.org/elephant-and-rhino-orphans-project/product/74-greenclaytreat

Read More »

Elephants in captivity develop foot disease If we needed further proof that ele…

Elephants in captivity develop foot disease

If we needed further proof that elephants belong in the wild, those in captivity require pedicures to combat foot disease resulting from lack of walking on natural terrain.

In the wild, elephants benefit from walking long distances, sometimes covering up to 50 miles per day over different surfaces, rubbing their feet on abrasive dirt which naturally wears down their toenails. With a huge amount of pressure applied to their feet, elephants in captivity are prone to painful and potentially deadly foot disease from standing for long periods on unnatural ground in restrictive spaces, which requires them to have their feet regularly ‘trimmed’.

http://dailym.ai/1Cpbtxa


The perfect pedicure for ELEPHANTS

A researcher at the University of Queensland, is working with collaborators to understand how captivity influences elephant foot form and function (a stock image is pictured).

Read More »

Africa: China to Make More Efforts On Elephant Conservation

[Focac] A Chinese official has said that China will make more efforts on the fields of management, law enforcement, education and capacity building to help African countries battle elephant poaching.

Read More »

Texas man who won hunting auction to be allowed to import black rhino trophy

US Fish and Wildlife Service says importing carcass will benefit conservationCorey Knowlton bid $350,000 to shoot endangered species in Namibia Related: Dallas Safari Club follows controversial rhino hunt with bids to shoot elephant The US government w…

Read More »

Tourists help to bust ivory dealers in Botswana Earlier this month, a German co…

Tourists help to bust ivory dealers in Botswana

Earlier this month, a German couple on holiday in Kasane were approached by a member of staff from a local safari camp who asked if they wanted to buy ‘elephant horn’ and presented them with four tusks. Martin and Christin Kotthoff feigned interest in the offer before immediately reporting the incident to the local anti-poaching unit.

Following this information, the Wildlife Anti-Poaching Unit together with local police apprehended Makuyungo and his accomplice, catching the pair red-handed during the handover of the four tusks at the camp. They now await trial in prison.

Christin Kotthoff, a member of a conservationist group in South Africa, said that she and her husband were “impressed [by] how professionally the local authorities handled the whole operation”. Botswana is seen as a leading African country in the protection of wildlife and, this week, two international meetings were held in Kasane on elephant poaching and illegal wildlife trade.

http://bit.ly/1908JL3

Read More »

South Africa: SAIIA Submission to Inquiry On Rhino Horn Trade

[SAIIA] South Africa is facing a rhino poaching crisis. One of the proposed policy mechanisms to address rhino poaching was the establishment of a Committee of Inquiry to deliberate on matters relating to a possible trade of Rhino Horn.

Read More »

Subscribe to our mailing list