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Petition successful! Move Sunder the elephant to Karnataka: Bombay High Court

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The Bombay high court on Tuesday directed the chief forest officer, wildlife (Kolhapur), to immediately take steps to relocate Sunder, a 14-year-old elephant currently housed in Kolhapur’s Jyotiba temple, and file a compliance report before the court by December 23.
A division bench of justices VM Kanade and MS Sonak gave this direction while hearing a petition filed by Dr Manilal Valliyate on behalf of People for Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA).

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Zimbabwe: Four Elephants Suspected Poisoned With Cyanide in Zimbabwe

[News24Wire] A hunter in western Zimbabwe has found the carcasses of four more elephants believed to have been poisoned by cyanide, according to a newspaper report on Monday.

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Future ivory trade is off the CITES table – and about time!

. CITES has voted not to adopt a decision-making mechanism for future trade in ivory – but what does this mean for elephants? After a frenetic and sometimes farcical afternoon…

The post Future ivory trade is off the CITES table – and about time! appeared first on EIA International.

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International Community Rallies To Protect A Monkey Species For The First Time In 30 Years

Publication Date: 
Tue, 09/27/2016

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International Community Rallies To Protect A Monkey Species For The First Time I

“The endangered Barbary macaque could get a new chance at survival at CITES CoP17”

For the first time in 30 years, Parties to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) will discuss increasing the level of protection for a monkey species. Barbary macaques will take center stage in Johannesburg, alongside emblematic fauna such as elephants, lions, rhinos and sharks.

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Revealed: how senior Laos officials cut deals with animal traffickers

Evidence obtained by the Guardian shows how treasury coffers swelled with 2% tax on trades worth up to $45m including tigers, rhinos and elephants

Officials at the highest level of an Asian government have been helping wildlife criminals smuggle millions of dollars worth of endangered species through their territory, the Guardian can reveal.

In an apparent breach of current national and international law, for more than a decade the office of the prime minister of Laos has cut deals with three leading traffickers to move hundreds of tonnes of wildlife through selected border crossings.

Related: The crime family at the centre of Asia’s animal trafficking network

Related: Animal trafficking: the $23bn criminal industry policed by a toothless regulator

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China accused of defying its own ban on breeding tigers to profit from body parts

Beijing faces pressure at global summit to close 200 farms where tigers are bred for luxury goods and end its obstructive tactics

China has been accused of deceiving the international community by allowing a network of farms to breed thousands of captive tigers for the sale of their body parts, in breach of their own longstanding ban on the trade.

The Chinese government has allowed about 200 specialist farms to hold an estimated 6,000 tigers for slaughter, before their skins are sold as decoration and their bones are marinated to produce tonics and lotions. Campaigners say this has increased demand for the products and provoked the poaching of thousands of wild tigers, whose global population is now down to just 3,500.

Related: Animal trafficking: the $23bn criminal industry policed by a toothless regulator

Related: The crime family at the centre of Asia’s animal trafficking network

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Tanzania: Two Charged With Smuggling Ivory Worth Sh4.2 Billion

[Citizen] Dar es Salaam -Two people, including a customs officer of the Tanzania Revenue Authority (TRA), Mr Joachim Nicolaus were yesterday charged at Kisutu Resident Magistrate’s Court with smuggling ivory worth over Sh4.2 billion.

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South Africa: What Motivates SA Citizens to Poach Rhino?

[News24Wire] Forced removals, poverty and Robin Hood-style “justice” are some of the reasons why South Africans from poor communities willingly work with international rhino poaching syndicates, a researcher at UCT has said.

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Zimbabwe: Chinese Foundation Fights Poachers in Zimbabwe With Eagle Eyes

[Focac] Harare -A charitable organization set up by Chinese nationals in Zimbabwe is helping protect the country’s wildlife with new equipment and technologies, including a microlight aircraft that can recognize poachers from above.

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Jubilation as CITES Votes to Stop Discussions Aimed at Promoting a Framework for Ivory Trade

Publication Date: 
Mon, 09/26/2016

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Jubilation as CITES Votes to Stop Discussions Aimed at Promoting a Framework for

Conservationists were jubilant this evening as CITES voted once and for all to abandon the controversial Decision Making Mechanisim (DMM) for a process to trade in ivory.

While the decision became a nail-biter in the final moments, those wanting to end any continued consideration for ongoing debate about possible future ivory trade were rewarded with a satisfying finish.

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Jubilation as CITES Votes to Stop Discussions Aimed at Promoting a Framework for Ivory Trade

Publication Date: 
Mon, 09/26/2016

Image: 
Jubilation as CITES Votes to Stop Discussions Aimed at Promoting a Framework for

Conservationists were jubilant this evening as CITES voted once and for all to abandon the controversial Decision Making Mechanisim (DMM) for a process to trade in ivory.

While the decision became a nail-biter in the final moments, those wanting to end any continued consideration for ongoing debate about possible future ivory trade were rewarded with a satisfying finish.

read more

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South Africa: ‘Saving endangered species is the responsibility of everyone’

As the 17th world wildlife conference opens, South Africa’s environment minister Edna Bomo Molewa explains the country’s commitment to protecting wildlife

Over the next two weeks, South Africa will welcome an estimated 3,500 delegates to Cop17, the 17th Conference of the Parties to the Convention on the International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (Cites).

Related: Saving Africa’s elephants: ‘Can you imagine them no longer existing?’

Related: In a world of 7 billion people how can we protect wildlife?

Related: Saving Africa’s elephants isn’t just a ‘white man’s job’

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Animal trafficking: the $23bn criminal industry policed by a toothless regulator

Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species finds itself confronting powerful networks, but has no detectives, police powers or firearms

The illegal trade in wildlife is a most attractive crime. But it is highly destructive, and its scale is threatening the extinction of some of the world’s most iconic species.

It is also grotesquely cruel: poachers slice off the faces of live rhinos to steal their horns; militia groups use helicopters to shoot down elephants for their tusks; factory farmers breed captive tigers to marinate their bones for medicinal wine and fry their flesh for the dinner plate; bears are kept for a lifetime in tiny cages to have their gall bladders regularly drained for liver tonic. But for any criminal who wants maximum money for minimum risk, it is most attractive.

Related: The crime family at the centre of Asia’s animal trafficking network

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